Measure 97

Argument in Favor

League of Women Voters of Oregon urges a Yes on Measure 97
Measure 97 funds important services
while requiring large corporations to pay their fair share.

The League of Women Voters of Oregon (LWVOR) is a grassroots, nonpartisan political non-profit organization that encourages informed and active participation in government in order to build better communities statewide. We envision informed Oregonians participating in a fully accessible, responsive, and transparent government to achieve the common good.

Part of our mission is to evaluate important measures proposed for the ballot and evaluate them to see if they would improve our state. Our advocacy committee analyzed Measure 97 and determined it would improve Oregon’s schools, its healthcare, and vital senior services.

Oregon Families Would Benefit from Measure 97

Every facet of Oregon’s schools and services budget has been plagued with revenue shortfalls for more than a generation. We have placed limits on the state’s ability to impose new taxes, which has caused inadequate funding of schools and public services.

Measure 97 is the best proposal in a decade to address the long-standing budget shortfalls facing schools and health care in the state. By focusing increased taxes only on corporations with more than $25 million in Oregon sales, Measure 97 protects Oregon small businesses, an important ingredient to a successful ballot measure. Finally, because Measure 97 dedicates new funding to K-12 education, healthcare, and services for senior citizens, we can be confident the money raised from these corporate taxes will be invested in the services Oregon families need.

Please join the League of Women Voters Oregon in supporting Measure 97.

(This information furnished by Alison Uhrlass, Vote Yes on 97 for a Dignified Retirement, Affordable Healthcare, and the Schools our Children Deserve.)


Argument in Favor

THE MAIN STREET ALLIANCE OF OREGON ENDORSES MEASURE 97

Measure 97 will hold big out-of-state corporations accountable for paying their fair share in taxes.

Corporate profits are at an all-time high, but Oregon families are struggling. Vital services – like education, healthcare, and senior services – have faced years of cuts. Revenue from Measure 97 would provide the resources to invest in lower class sizes, access to healthcare for the 383,000 Oregonians who currently have none, and in-home care for seniors.

For years, big out-of-state corporations have used loopholes and offshore tax havens to pay lower taxes in Oregon than in any other state in the country. That means that Oregon’s small businesses shoulder a disproportionate share of the burden – with Oregon’s smallest businesses paying far more taxes as a percentage of their sales than the largest corporations do.

Measure 97 will affect only the largest corporations doing business in Oregon — those with more than $25 million in Oregon sales. Most of the businesses that will pay more are out-of-state corporations: less than one half of one percent of Oregon businesses will be affected. Measure 97 will level the playing field between big out-of-state corporations and Oregon’s small businesses, forcing the biggest corporations to finally pay their fair share for schools, healthcare, and senior services.

The Main Street Alliance is a network of small business owners joining together to advance public policies that are good for our businesses, our workers, and the communities we serve. The Main Street Alliance advocates for economy-boosting investments – and that’s why we’re supporting Measure 97.

The Main Street Alliance of Oregon urges you to vote Yes on Measure 97.

(This information furnished by Laura Simmons, Vote Yes on 97 to Protect Small Businesses and Make Large Out of State Corporations Pay Their Fair Share.)


Argument in Favor

City Club Recommends a YES Vote on Measure 97
A Corporate Tax for Adequate Funding of Schools and Critical Services

Oregon has faced a consistent revenue shortage for the past 25 years, resulting in fewer opportunities and protections for Oregon's students and vulnerable populations. Forty years ago, corporations paid 18.5% of all Oregon income taxes; today they pay just 6.7%. While Oregon’s economy and population have grown, limitations on the state's ability to raise revenue have prevented adequate funding of schools and critical services.

Why vote YES?

Who is City Club of Portland?

We bring together civic-minded people to make Portland and Oregon better places to live, work and play for everyone. Read our complete recommendation and become a City Club member at: www.pdxcityclub.org.

(This information furnished by Mike Marshall, Executive Director / City Club of Portland.)


Argument in Favor

Measure 97 Protects Consumers and Small Businesses
While it Makes Large Corporations Pay Their Fair Share

Two major independent studies have found that Oregon has the country’s lowest corporate taxes. Corporations enjoy Oregon’s current low tax rate, so they will attempt to scare consumers away from Measure 97. Economic facts do not back up corporate claims.

Measure 97 is designed to make only corporations that do more than $25 million in Oregon sales pay an increased minimum tax. It creates investments for families and levels the playing field for small businesses.

Measure 97 will hold corporations accountable while protecting small businesses and consumers.

Amazon and other major retailers use national pricing strategies. Their Oregon prices won’t increase in response to the state no longer having the country’s lowest corporate taxes. Oregon households will not be footing the tax bill. Oregonians will simply no longer be subsidizing lower prices in other states.

Because the measure only affects corporations that do more than $25 million in Oregon sales, fewer than one-quarter of 1 percent of the businesses registered in Oregon will pay the tax; and because these huge firms compete with smaller firms unaffected by the tax, they will not be able to respond by raising prices without losing customers. Direct evidence collected by the Oregon Consumer League confirms that prices don't go up in a state when corporate taxes are higher. A box of cereal or a roll of duct tape is the same price in Oregon, the state with the lowest corporate taxes in the U.S., as it is in all the other states that tax corporations more.

Economists Agree: Measure 97 Protects Small Businesses and Working Families, and It Invests in Schools, Healthcare, and Seniors

(This information furnished by Laura Simmons, Vote Yes on 97 to Hold Large Out-of-State Corporations Accountable and Invest in Oregon’s Economy.)


Argument in Favor

Nurses Support Measure 97
Because Holding Corporations Accountable
Means Affordable Healthcare for Oregonians

Nurses know when families have access to the healthcare they need when they need it, they are healthier, live longer, and are more financially stable. That’s what every child in Oregon deserves.

Having healthcare can be life and death — yet 383,000 Oregonians and 37,000 children are uninsured. It’s unacceptable and it doesn’t have to be this way.

It’s frustrating to know that one reason families in Oregon don’t have the affordable healthcare they need is that large and mostly out-of-state corporations don’t pay their fair share in taxes. In fact Oregon ranks 50th in the nation in corporate taxes. If we ask large corporations to do their part, we could invest in quality, affordable healthcare for all Oregonians.

That’s why we support Measure 97. It makes only big corporations — ones with more than $25 million in sales — pay a higher minimum tax on sales above $25 million, and dedicates the money to healthcare, education, and senior care.

“Corporations like Bank of America can afford to pay more — Oregon families can’t afford another day without health coverage.”

Bruce Humphreys, BSN
Bend, Oregon

Here’s what Measure 97 could mean in Oregon:

So much could be done that would make every community in Oregon better, and that’s why we support Measure 97 so strongly.

“This is our chance to invest in Oregon’s families. Measure 97 can make our communities healthier by increasing access to healthcare and decreasing out-of-pocket costs for patients.”

Susan King, MS, RN, CEN, FAAN
Portland, Oregon

Please join Oregon’s nurses and healthcare advocates in voting Yes on Measure 97, so we can make critical investments for Oregon families.

(This information furnished by Alison Uhrlass, Vote Yes on 97 for a Dignified Retirement, Affordable Healthcare, and the Schools our Children Deserve.)


Argument in Favor

OREGON PARENTS AND TEACHERS KNOW MEASURE 97 IS NEEDED
TO GIVE OUR KIDS THE EDUCATION THEY DESERVE

The stats clearly show that Oregon’s schools aren’t good enough for our kids:

Oregon has the 3rd largest class sizes.
We have the 4th lowest graduation rates.
We’ve cut almost half of our Career and Technical Education classes.
We have been ranked 39th in school funding.

But if you’ve been in a classroom anytime in the last decade, you don’t need stats to tell you we’re shortchanging our kids.

Teachers have almost no time for one-on-one instruction. Our kids no longer have access to electives, and they are missing opportunities to truly thrive. And in the span of an Oregon student’s K-12 public education, they receive a full year less instructional time than Washington students.

It doesn’t have to be this way.
With Measure 97, we can invest in Oregon’s kids, and Oregon’s future.

Measure 97 funds education by increasing the corporate minimum tax on large and out-of-state corporations so that we can finally make real investments in our schools.

Oregon currently has the country’s lowest corporate taxes. Making corporations — like Comcast, Monsanto, and Bank of America — that do more than $25 million a year in taxes pay more to support our communities makes sense.

If you have a kid in an overcrowded and underfunded classroom, you’ve probably dreamed of what it would mean for them to get real one-on-one instructional time and the tools they need to thrive. A great K-12 education doesn’t have to be a dream — Measure 97 can make it a reality, but we need your vote to finally give our kids the schools they deserve.

Measure 97 is Oregon’s chance to fix these problems. It’s an opportunity for Oregon to invest in a better future with great schools for every Oregon school kid.

THE OREGON PARENT TEACHER ASSOCIATION (PTA)
PROUDLY ENDORSES MEASURE 97

(This information furnished by Alison Uhrlass, Vote Yes on 97 for a Dignified Retirement, Affordable Healthcare, and the Schools our Children Deserve.)


Argument in Favor

THE COALITION FOR MEASURE 97

Measure 97 is supported by a diverse and strong coalition of hundreds of endorsers and thousands of volunteers — from parents, teachers, and nurses, to small businesses, economists, and community advocates from every region of Oregon.

Our supporters know this is our first real opportunity in decades to make critical investments in Oregon’s schools, healthcare, and senior services.

The Following Organizations
Urge You to Vote YES on Measure 97:

Tax Fairness Oregon

Oregon Nurses Association

Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility

Oregon Consumer League

Main Street Alliance of Oregon

Oregon AFL-CIO

Oregon State Council for Retired Citizens

Causa Oregon

Oregon League of Conservation Voters

Democratic Party of Oregon

Oregon AFSCME

Family Forward Oregon

Jobs with Justice

NARAL Pro-Choice Oregon

Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (PCUN)

Upstream Public Health

Progressive Party of Oregon

Confederation of Oregon School Administrators (COSA)

Oregon Latino Health Coalition

Healthy Kids Learn Better Coalition

Rural Organizing Project

League of Women Voters

Oregon State Fire Fighters Council

Oregon Education Association

Partnership for Safety and Justice

Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon

American Federation of Teachers

Human Services Coalition of Oregon

Oregon Health Equity Alliance

Oregon NOW (National Organization for Women)

OPAL Environmental Justice Oregon

United Seniors of Oregon

Oregon Association for the Education of Young Children

Service Employees International Union (SEIU)

ONE Voice for Child Care

Western States Center

Oregon School Employees Association

Oregon Assembly for Black Affairs

The Bus Project

Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO)

Fair Shot for All Coalition

Working Families Party

The Sierra Club

Unite Oregon

Oregon Center for Public Policy (OCCP)

Children First for Oregon

(This information furnished by Alison Uhrlass, Vote Yes on 97 for a Dignified Retirement, Affordable Healthcare, and the Schools our Children Deserve.)


Argument in Favor

Oregon’s kids deserve better.
That’s why parents, teachers, and advocates are behind Measure 97.

We all know how much of an impact a teacher can have on a child’s life. Everyone can remember that one teacher that made their life better. Teachers can change lives, but they need the time and tools to make a difference in the classroom.

“In my 15 years of teaching, I’ve seen first-hand how disinvestment in education has impacted my students. It has created larger class sizes, fewer programs, and less time for them to learn. I’d love to be able to give my students more one-on-one attention, but that gets harder with each year that passes. I worry that hundreds of thousands of kids are missing out on the opportunity to succeed. We must do better.”

Heather Anderson
2016 Oregon Teacher of the Year

School budget shortfalls mean too many of our children are slipping through the cracks. Want proof? Oregon now has one of the lowest graduation rates in the country. We need to make a change before it’s too late. Measure 97 is the change our state’s students need.

Measure 97 will make large and out-of-state corporations pay their fair share so we can improve the quality of our kids’ education. We can hire back thousands of teachers, reduce class sizes, and restore school days. Measure 97 means we can finally be on a path to raising our graduation rate.

Measure 97 protects Oregon families while raising money for schools because it only taxes corporations that do more than $25 million in sales like Monsanto, Comcast, and Bank of America. Right now, our schools struggle because corporations doing business in Oregon pay lower taxes here than in any other state. Measure 97 will fix this — and help Oregon families.

Join parents, teachers, the Oregon PTA, and Children First for Oregon in supporting Measure 97, the best solution for a brighter Oregon future.

(This information furnished by Alison Uhrlass, Vote Yes on 97 for a Dignified Retirement, Affordable Healthcare, and the Schools our Children Deserve.)


Argument in Favor

LEADING INDEPENDENT ECONOMISTS AGREE
Measure 97 Improves the Economy Through Corporate Accountability and Critical Investments

Measure 97 is written to only increase the minimum tax on corporate sales above $25 million. This means small businesses and consumers are protected by the tax. 82% of the corporations affected by the measure are headquartered outside the state. According to the Anderson Economic Group, Oregon has the nation’s lowest corporate taxes — out-of-state and multinational corporations can afford to pay a higher rate in Oregon. They pay higher taxes in every other state.

Economists from around Oregon have examined Measure 97 and agree that it shields small businesses and consumers and makes only corporations with more than $25 million in sales pay more.

MEASURE 97 IS RIGHT FOR OREGON’S ECONOMY

"The most important thing we can do for the Oregon economy is to invest in pre-K and K-12 education. Measure 97 will do that by ending decades of underfunding our classrooms, especially career and technical education which is the key to a skilled workforce. And it will level the playing field for Oregon-based small businesses that are paying their fair share in taxes by requiring big out-of-state companies to do the same."

Scott Bailey
Economist, MS of Economics, Portland State University

ONLY THE LARGEST CORPORATIONS WILL PAY

“The Anderson Economic Group, which compares the taxes businesses pay with their profits (pre-tax operating surplus), ranks Oregon 50th — dead last in the country — in corporate taxes. The only reasonable way to generate the revenue we need to improve Oregon’s schools, healthcare and senior services is by forcing corporations to pay their fair share.”

Martin Hart-Landsberg, PhD
Professor Emeritus of Economics, Lewis & Clark College

“Measure 97 is designed to hold the largest corporations accountable. It will raise taxes on only the largest corporations, affecting one-quarter of 1% of the companies doing business in Oregon.”

Mary C. King, PhD
Professor Emerita of Economics, Portland State University

(This information furnished by Laura Simmons, Vote Yes on 97 to Hold Large Out-of-State Corporations Accountable and Invest in Oregon’s Economy.)


Argument in Favor

There are four things Oregonians should know before voting on Measure 97

Individual Oregonians pay more than their share of state taxes

40 years ago, 18% of Oregon’s income tax revenues were paid by corporations. Today it is only 6.7%. Worse, Oregon is dead last in the country – 50th out of 50 states – in total corporate taxes according to the respected national accounting firm Ernst & Young.

Fewer than 1% of Oregon businesses will pay under measure 97

All sole proprietors, Sub-S and B corps, and the vast majority of C corporations will not see an increase in their tax burden under Measure 97. Only C corporations with more that $25 million in Oregon sales would have their minimum tax rate increased.

Most costs will be paid by big out of state corporations

The NO campaign wants to convince consumers that if Measure 97 passes, costs will be passed along to them. This is just a scare tactic. In fact, there wouldn’t even be a vote NO campaign if big corporations could just pass along the costs to consumers.

Without Measure 97 we will be forced to endure budget cuts

Measure 97 may not be a perfect measure, but it will shape our state’s future for years to come. If it fails, we will face the painful dilemma of declining budgets and increased need for funding of education and critical health care all across Oregon.

Right now we have one of the shortest school years in the nation, and the third-largest class sizes. We have seen a 29% increase in the number of seniors living in poverty since 2008. More than 200,000 people struggle to get by without affordable health insurance.

We cannot cut our way to a better Oregon. Join us in voting YES on this important ballot measure.

Governor Kate Brown

Former Governor Barbara Roberts

Former Governor Ted Kulongoski

(This information furnished by Robert Stoll.)


Argument in Favor

Our Students Can’t Wait Yet Another Decade – Please Vote Yes on 97

We are the association for Oregon’s public school principals, superintendents and administrators. Our daily work focuses on setting our kids up for lifelong success. We know our students deserve better than the third-largest class sizes and one of the shortest school years in the nation. They deserve schools that offer art, music, PE, vocational and career and technical programs. They deserve to graduate from high school prepared for career and college success.

In our communities, parents and others tell us all the time that our kids:

There is only one way to make these things happen – more resources for schools. Politicians – even those who see and acknowledge the problem – have been unable or unwilling to solve it for more than 20 years. That’s an entire generation of Oregon students.

Without Measure 97, we won’t be able to do what’s needed: hire more teachers, reduce class sizes or provide the well-rounded education our children need to be successful in life. We are committed to making sure that the money Measure 97 raises will directly benefits our students, and we are confident that it will.

We simply can’t wait another 20 years while politicians continue to talk about it. This generation of Oregon students is counting on us to do something now. That’s why we are supporting Measure 97.

The Confederation of Oregon School Administrators (COSA) urges Yes on 97

(This information furnished by Morgan Allen, Confederation of Oregon School Administrators.)


Argument in Favor

OREGON SMALL BUSINESSES SUPPORT MEASURE 97

Oregon ranks dead last in corporate taxes.
Measure 97 will level the playing field for businesses like mine.

Right now, Oregon has the lowest corporate taxes in the nation. For years, large out-of-state corporations have taken advantage of tax loopholes and subsidies, and used offshore tax havens to keep from paying their fair share. That might be good for huge out-of-state corporations, but it’s bad for Oregon’s small businesses, which have been forced to bear a disproportionate burden.

Oregon’s low corporate taxes are hurting our families and our communities. Because large and out of state corporations aren’t paying their fair share, our state is suffering:

Measure 97 will solve these problems by asking the largest corporations – those with over $25 million in Oregon sales – to pay more, and dedicating the revenue directly to education, healthcare, and senior services.

Under Measure 97, only the largest corporations will pay. Small Oregon businesses like mine won’t pay a penny more.

I’m a small business owner, and I’m standing with hundreds of Oregon businesses in support of Measure 97.

Maurice Rahming
O’Neill Electric
Portland, Oregon

(This information furnished by Laura Simmons, Vote Yes on 97 to Protect Small Businesses and Make Large, Out of State Corporations Pay Their Fair Share.)


Argument in Favor

You Can Tell a Lot by the Company You Keep

Who Opposes Measure 97?
Corporations have raised millions of dollars to defeat Measure 97.
Here are just a few of their top contributors:

Comcast Cable
Equilon Enterprises LLC (Shell Oil)
Phillips 66
Cambia (Insurance)
Standard Insurance
The P&G Company
Farmers Insurance
Cargill, Inc.
International Paper
CenturyLink
Johnson & Johnson
Liberty Mutual Insurance Company
U.S. Bank – Oregon
Walmart Stores, Inc.
American Family Insurance Group
Wells Fargo

To see a full list of corporate funders visit: https://secure.sos.state.or.us/orestar

Who Supports Measure 97?
Measure 97 is endorsed by over 800 community organizations, economists, parents and teachers, local leaders, and over 290 Oregon businesses.
Here are just a few:

League of Women Voters
Healthy Kids Learn Better Coalition
Tax Fairness Oregon
Oregon Nurses Association
Human Services Coalition of Oregon
Oregon State Council for Retired Citizens
Service Employees International Union (SEIU)
Children First for Oregon
Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility
Oregon State Fire Fighters Council
Rural Organizing Project
Oregon League of Conservation Voters
Oregon Education Association
Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO) American Federation of Teachers
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon United Seniors of Oregon
Oregon AFL-CIO
Oregon Health Equity Alliance
Oregon Center for Public Policy (OCPP)
NARAL Pro-Choice Oregon
Fair Shot for All Coalition
Oregon NOW (National Organization for Women)
Oregon AFSCME
Oregon Consumer League
Oregon Opportunity Network
Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (PCUN)
Working Families Party
Oregon School Nurses Association
Main Street Alliance of Oregon
OPAL Environmental Justice Oregon
Oregon Public Health Association
Partnership for Safety and Justice
Upstream Public Health
Community Alliance of Tenants

To see a full list of supporters visit: voteyeson97.org

(This information furnished by Alison Uhrlass, Vote Yes on 97 for a Dignified Retirement, Affordable Healthcare, and the Schools our Children Deserve.)


Argument in Favor

TAX FAIRNESS OREGON: VOTE YES ON MEASURE 97

Since 2003, the volunteers of Tax Fairness Oregon (TFO) have worked towards an equitable and adequate tax system. We’ve also saved the state millions of dollars in tax giveaways. That’s why we support Measure 97.

For decades, Oregon’s budget has been squeezed between giant boulders: property tax limits imposed in 1990 by Measure 5 and the decline in the share of taxes paid by corporations. Measure 5 squeezed the budget indirectly because the limits on property taxes required the Legislature to replace the funds lost by local schools.

The Legislature accomplished that by cutting other state services. So Oregon’s fiscal crisis applies to all state institutions, not just to schools. That means 97 will help the whole state budget, not just the school budget.

Early on, the Legislative Revenue Office estimated that corporations will pass $613 through to households with incomes between $48,000 and $68,000. It would be $500 for households with income from $21,000 to $34,000 and $372 for households with less than $21,000. It’s unlikely the tax would cost consumers that much.

Ask yourself: would your family be willing to pay that much more if it meant your children and your neighbor’s could graduate high school on time and afford to go on to college or technical school? What if your household could afford better health insurance, or your grandparents could remain in their home? 97 will make those things possible.

Oregon voters face the possibility of pass-through whenever we vote to increase corporate taxes, because corporations can try to pass any tax along. If voters are too fearful about pass-through to vote for an increase in corporate taxes, there won’t be much chance to make corporations pay their fair share. That’s why opponents of 97 are threatening a pass-through so loudly.

Passing 97 will still leave Oregon encumbered by Measure 5. TFO will need your support to take it on.

(This information furnished by Jody Wiser, Tax Fairness Oregon.)


Argument in Favor

SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS SUPPORT MEASURE 97

Measure 97 is good for small businesses — and good for Oregon’s economy.

Small businesses are a huge force in Oregon’s economy – we create good jobs and support our communities. Meanwhile, for years, big out-of-state corporations have been exploiting loopholes and offshore tax havens to avoid paying their fair share of taxes. In fact, in 2013, 530 corporations paid no state taxes. And experts say that Oregon loses $283 million each year to offshore tax havens.

That means small businesses like ours often pay higher tax rates than huge corporations like Comcast, Chevron, and Bank of America.

Measure 97 would level the playing field — it protects small businesses from tax increases, while forcing big out-of-state corporations to pay their share.

Under Measure 97, only the largest corporations — those with over $25 million in Oregon sales – would pay more. It would make small businesses more competitive, enabling us to hire more workers and boost our local economies. And Measure 97 dedicates the money to schools, healthcare, and senior services — investments in our future that will benefit all Oregonians.

We’ve studied the measure closely, and we know that our businesses and our state will benefit. Small businesses won’t pay a penny more — but we’ll be better able to compete with big corporations if everyone is paying their share.

Small business owners across Oregon agree: Measure 97 is good for business and good for Oregon’s economy.

We’re small business owners, and we urge you to join us in voting YES for Measure 97.

Rob Cohen, Falling Sky Brewing
Eugene, Oregon

Sue Hanna and James Jonke, Oregon Bike Shop
Portland, Oregon

Jesse Hayes, Archive Coffee & Bar
Salem, Oregon

(This information furnished by Alison Uhrlass, Vote Yes on 97 for a Dignified Retirement, Affordable Healthcare, and the Schools our Children Deserve.)


Argument in Favor

Measure 97 is good for Oregon's family farms — and good for Oregon’s economy.

About 98% of Oregon’s farms and ranches are family owned and operated. They are the backbone of our agricultural economy and provide food and farm products to Oregonians and customers worldwide. To continue to be successful, we need a healthy and educated workforce.

Our state’s economy is hurting and our family farms are struggling to find workers. It is shameful that our high school graduation rate is among the lowest in the country. We work hard and pay our taxes, but Oregon needs more. We need large, international corporations like Monsanto and Wal-Mart to step up and pay their fair share. Corporations like Monsanto and Wal-Mart make billions of dollars but many pay next to nothing to support our state.

Measure 97 will require large multinational corporations to help provide needed funding for Oregon’s schools and healthcare. It will improve our quality of life and help our family farms and small businesses compete in our national marketplace.

“I’ve worked hard to build a strong, local business here in Oregon and I take pride in what I’ve grown. I don’t particularly love paying taxes — but I do my part and pay my fair share. However, big out-of-state competitors do not pay theirs. We need to hold them accountable and level the playing field for Oregon-grown businesses.”

Don Schoen
Rolling Acres Hazelnut Orchard
Hillsboro, Oregon

“As a lifelong Oregonian, I am proud to have built a successful nursery business in our state. I received a quality education in Oregon, an education that gave me the tools to start my business. I’m frustrated that same education is no longer available to our children. Our children deserve better. It’s way past time to require large corporations to pay their fair share to ensure our future prosperity.”

Jim Gilbert
Northwoods Nursery
Molalla, Oregon

Please join Oregon farmers in supporting Measure 97.

(This information furnished by Laura Simmons, Vote Yes on 97 to Protect Small Businesses and Make Large, Out of State Corporations Pay Their Fair Share.)


Argument in Favor

OREGON: DEAD LAST IN CORPORATE TAXES

One of the most significant reasons that Oregon’s schools and critical services like healthcare and senior services are severely underfunded is one simple fact:

Oregon is ranked 50th Among States in the Nation for Corporate Taxes
(Actually 51st, including the District of Columbia)

SOURCE: 2016 State Business Tax Burden Rankings, 7th Edition, Anderson Economic Group Rankings and total corporate taxes as a percent of corporate profits

1. North Dakota 19.2%

2. Alaska 16.8%

3. Vermont 14.6%

4. Maine 13.9%

5. West Virginia 13.4%

6. Hawaii 13.0%

7. Rhode Island 12.6%

8. New Mexico 12.6%

9. District of Columbia 12.0%

10. Wyoming 11.9%

11. Mississippi 11.7%

12. New Hampshire 11.5%

13. New York 11.3%

14. Florida 11.1%

15. Wisconsin 10.9%

16. New Jersey 10.7%

17. Montana 10.7%

18. South Carolina 10.5%

19. Minnesota 10.3%

20. Illinois 10.3%

21. Connecticut 10.1%

22. Kansas 10.1%

23. Washington 9.9%

24. Pennsylvania 9.7%

25. Nevada 9.5%

27. Massachusetts 9.3%

28. Arizona 8.7%

29. Virginia 8.6%

30. Kentucky 8.5%

31. Maryland 8.5%

32. Michigan 8.4%

33. Colorado 8.4%

34. California 8.4%

35. Idaho 8.3%

36. Ohio 8.3%

37. Nebraska 8.0%

38. Tennessee 8.0%

39. Alabama 7.9%

40. Texas 7.8%

41. Missouri 7.5%

42. Georgia 7.5%

43. Delaware 7.5%

44. Louisiana 7.4%

45. Utah 7.4%

46. Indiana 7.3%

47. Oklahoma 7.2%

48. Iowa 7.2%

49. South Dakota 7.1%

50. North Carolina 6.7%

51. Oregon 6.6%

Under Measure 97, Oregon will still be a low business tax state, but one where the biggest corporations will be responsible for investing in the services they benefit from.

(This information furnished by Laura Simmons, Vote Yes on 97 to Hold Large Out-of-State Corporations Accountable and Invest in Oregon’s Economy.)


Argument in Favor

Click here to view argument furnished by Kara N Carmosino, Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon.


Argument in Favor

Accountants and Lawyers Believe Corporations Should Pay Their Fair Share of Taxes

Over the years Oregon’s schools have greatly deteriorated while Oregon’s seniors are increasingly living in poverty and many Oregonians cannot afford health care. The non-partisan State Legislative Fiscal Office reports that, without new revenues, there will be a $1.35 billion shortfall for 2017-2019 just to maintain existing programs.

Meanwhile, income taxes from corporations in Oregon have decreased. Thirty years ago, corporations provided about 18% of all Oregon state revenues; now corporations provide just 6%. Frequently, large out-of-state corporations employ sophisticated accounting maneuvers that reduce their Oregon taxes to nothing while they make millions of dollars of sales in Oregon. The national accounting firm Ernst & Young says Oregon has the lowest business taxes in the entire U.S.; Measure 97 will only take Oregon business taxes from 50th in the nation to about 40th.

Measure 97 increases the minimum tax paid by only the largest C corporations, those doing over $25 million in sales in Oregon. Over 80% of these companies are huge out-of-state corporations which take their profits elsewhere but benefit from Oregon sales and Oregon’s low business taxes. Measure 97 applies to less than 1% of all business entities in Oregon, and does not apply to sole proprietorships, partnerships, LLCs, and Sub-S corporations. There is a reason large corporations are fighting Measure 97: they enjoy paying little to receive the benefits of doing business in Oregon.

Measure 97 will correct decades of declining business tax revenues. Measure 97 will re-balance our tax system to assure that big corporations pay their fair share in supporting our community.

Richard B. Solomon,
CPA

David Lokting,
Attorney

Jim McDermott,
Attorney

(This information furnished by Robert Stoll, Yes on 97 - Because It Is Time Corporations Pay Their Fair Share in Taxes.)